The good news: my daughter will never become a smoker

Smokers, I hope you take this opportunity to quit smoking today, if not for yourself, then for me. And my daughter.

Today is the Great American Smokeout. Last year, if I recall, I wrote some anti-smoking screed, and someone thought it was terribly mean to smokers (I didn’t think so.)

I decided to write something nice about smokers this year. Well, until my daughter had some particularly bad reactions recently. If someone walks by her with a lit cigarette, she starts hacking uncontrollably. She can control this only a little by holding her breath, IF she sees the smoker coming. (From years of living with a smoker, I have learned the ability to block the inside of my nose and breathe through my mouth until the danger passes.)

Her asthma is apparently more severe than mine – she’s missed school this fall because of it. Yes, I recognize that cigarettes are legal, and they are highly addictive, and that smokers are an oppressed minority in the US. But I suffer when around even a heavy smoker who isn’t currently smoking, I’ve discovered, and my child suffers even more, so you can guess where my sympathies lie.

So, smokers, I hope you take this opportunity to quit smoking today, if not for yourself, then for me. And my daughter.
***
You know what make me feel ambivalent? Those e-cigarettes. I’ve been around them only a few times, but they do not bother me physically, which is rather astonishing. They may be doing damage to the smoker, who might be getting a false sense of safety, and I AM concerned about that.

Author: Roger

I'm a librarian. I hear music, even when it's not being played. I used to work at a comic book store, and it still informs my life. I won once on JEOPARDY! - ditto.

4 thoughts on “The good news: my daughter will never become a smoker”

  1. I expect we’ll eventually hear from someone who’s allergic to some volatile organic compound emitted in trace quantities by e-cigs.

    The premise, I admit, fascinates me: all the addiction without all the lung damage. Then again, I have never actually smoked, and don’t really feel like starting.

  2. I pity the people who are addicted to nicotine and applaud anyone who takes steps to overcome it. I think it’s very sad when someone knows they are addicted but refuses to do anything about it.

  3. I’ve been quit long enough that cigarettes smell disgusting. I don’t get the people who say you will “always crave one.”

    I do still use the mint lozenges, though… and haven’t lost the 8 lbs I gained yet… šŸ™ But it’s only been 5 months, so there’s still hope.

  4. I smoked for about 6 years or so but quit almost 30 years ago now. I can’t stand the smell and don’t even like to stand next to some one who smokes even when they are not smoking. They stink.

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