Posts Tagged ‘music’

sam-and-daveSamuel David Moore (born October 12, 1935) and the late Dave Prater (May 9, 1937 – April 9, 1988) comprised, inarguably, the most successful and critically acclaimed soul singing duo, Sam & Dave, from 1961 to 1981. They are members of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame (1992) and the Vocal Group Hall of Fame. Sam Moore has continued his career as a solo performing and recording artist.

They had a complicated recording situation, signed to Atlantic Records, but leased to the soul label Stax for a time in order to get the Memphis feel. Their working relationship was also strange; “according to Moore, they did not speak to each other offstage for almost 13 years.”

A Place Nobody Can Find, written by David Porter, was their first STAX single, b/w Goodnight Baby (Isaac Hayes/Porter), both sides featured Dave Prater singing lead. It failed to chart. That would soon change.

Many of the song description narratives are from the great book Soulsville U.S.A. Read the rest of this entry »

jackie blueIt was really annoying. One Saturday, I was listening to a radio being broadcast within some retail store or restaurant when I heard a song I recognize. I could identify it in three notes.

“That’s ‘Jackie Blue,'” I said aloud, to no one in particular. But then I was stumped. Who SANG it?

I even own the song on a CD compilation of Southern rock. Read the rest of this entry »

John-LennonMy friend Dan sent me this article How did the Beatles Get Their Name? Any Beatles fan worth his or her salt has heard the Flaming Pie story:
Many people ask what are Beatles? Why Beatles? Ugh, Beatles, how did the name arrive? So we will tell you. It came in a vision–a man appeared in a flaming pie and said unto them “From this day on you are Beatles with an A.” “Thank you, Mister Man,” they said, thanking him.

Flaming Pie, not coincidentally, is the name of a 1997 Paul McCartney album.

In the book The Gospel according to the Beatles by Steven Turner, it’s clear that John, far more than any of his cohorts, grew up with religious training. He was living with his Aunt Mimi (Stanley) Smith, who grew up Anglican, though neither she nor her sisters attended church as adults.

Still, Mimi and her sisters made sure their children were sent to Sunday school. John was a chorister and member of a Bible class. “For a time, he was attending events at the church four days a week.”

It was that respectable, impersonal, “bourgeois” version of Christianity Read the rest of this entry »

singingnunLess than two months before the Beatles hit America, the number one song on the US Billboard charts, for four straight weeks, was Dominique, a “French language popular song, written and performed” by Sister Luc-Gabrielle, “better known as Sœur Sourire or The Singing Nun.”

The story is that back in 1961, another nun had asked the folks at the Brussels office of Philips Records if they could pay the label to press a couple hundred copies of their songs, to be given away. Philips executives said no, but the nuns were persistent, and finally snagged a brief recording session the next year

Sister Luc-Gabrielle, accompanied by four other nuns, recorded over a dozen songs. The album became a hit in Europe, but got little traction in the US Read the rest of this entry »

Julie_AndrewsIt is quite likely that the final episode of MASH that aired in 1983 was NOT the highest rated non-sports television broadcast in United States history.

Some believe that the 1957 broadcast of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s CINDERELLA, starring a rising Broadway performer named Julie Andrews eclipsed it, with 107 million viewers in the US alone.
Read the rest of this entry »

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